OctoPrint Installation and Setup

Posted on 14/11/2020

OctoPrint is an open source web interface for your 3D printer that allows you to control and monitor all aspects of your printer and print jobs, right from your browser.

OctoPrint can run on a number of different systems and platforms, but it is most commonly run on a Raspberry Pi. You can either install OctoPrint manually or use a distribution called OctoPi which is based on the Raspbian OS. This distribution comes with a pre-configured version of OctoPrint plus a setup mjpeg-streamer in order to support webcams. At Mattalabs, we use OctoPrint on many of are printers - it really is a great piece of software! Also, if you are running OctoPrint you can download the Mattacloud plugin for remote control of your 3D printer from anywhere in addition to some nifty AI error detection features.

In this blog we shall cover both installation methods: OctoPi, Manual… and for the manual setup we aim to cover how to do so with Linux, Mac and Windows.

OctoPi

At present we recommend using the Raspberry Pi 4 Model be or Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ for your setup. Raspberry Pi Zero W is definitely not recommended as it does not have the computing requirements to run OctoPrint effectively and you will encounter performance issues.

You can download the latest stable version of OctoPi
from the following link: Latest Stable OctoPi Version with nighly builds available here.

How to install OctoPi

  1. First, unzip and extract the image and install it onto an SD card. We suggest a 32GB SD card as that is the max size the Pi will take and it allows for many files to be uploaded. The Raspberry Pi website has a fantastic guide walking you through the process of writing images to the SD card. balenaEtcher is a graphical SD card writing tool that works on Mac OS, Linux and Windows and is super easy to use, we highly recommend this tool.

  2. After you have written the image to the SD card before removing it from your computer we want to edit the octopi-wpa-supplicant.txt file which is stored in the root directory of the flashed SD card. In this file you will configure your WiFI connection.

  3. If you plan to use a camera with OctoPrint then at this stage you should open octopi.txt which is also located in the root directory of the flashed SD card. Here follow the instructions in the file depending on your camera type (e.g. USB webcam or Raspberry Pi Camera Module). You can set the camera options, for example if you have the commonly used Logitech C270 we would recommend the following options:

camera_usb_options="-r 1280x720 -f 30"

And for the Pi Camera we recommend the following options:

camera_raspi_options="-x 1296 -y 972 -fps 10 -quality 95"
  1. Remove the SD card from your computer and insert it in the Raspberry Pi. You can now boot the Pi from the card and hopefully it should connect to the network.

Configuration and Setup

Now that the Pi has booted you can login via ssh (the device will be located at octopi.local if the computer you are using to access it support bonjour or using the IP address the Pi has been assigned by the router. The default username is pi and default password is raspberry. So the command you use will be something like this:

ssh pi@octopi.local

Now run sudo raspi-config and once it has opened change the Pi’s password via “Change user password”. On this screen you can also change your timezone via “Localization Options” > “Timezone”. Additionally you might want to change your hostname via “Network Options” > “Hostname”. Once done OctoPrint will not longer be accessible under octopi.local but as newhostname.local.

Access OctoPrint through http://octopi.local or http://<your pi's ip address> or http://<your new hostname>.local. Https is available too, with a self-signed certificate (which means your browser will warn you about it being invalid).

At present, the latest stable release of OctoPi is running Python 2.7, and due to Python 2’s EOL it is recommeneded to upgrade to Python 3. There is a great post on how to do so here.

Manual Setup

No matter what OS you are using there are four main steps to setup OctoPrint, namely:

  • Installing Python 2.7 including pip and virtualenv.
  • Creating a virtual environment somewhere: virtualenv env
  • Installing OctoPrint into that virtual environment: env/bin/pip install octoprint
  • OctoPrint may then be started through ./env/bin/octoprint or with an absolute path /path/to/env/bin/octoprint

More detailed instructions for each will be coming soon but for now head over to https://octoprint.org/download/ for more instructions and information.

Recent tutorials


Setup Multiple Webcams with OctoPrint

Posted on 07/01/2021

It is most useful to setup multiple webcams with OctoPrint. Personally I find that have a nozzle camera in addition to a camera viewing the whole bed is very useful. It allows you to clearly view the effects of flow and feed rate adjustments and can offer much insight into why…


FDM 3D Printer Materials Guide

Posted on 18/12/2020

This guide summarises a wide range of properties and characteristics for a variety of 3D printable materials. This overview by no means covers all the possible materials which are available to users of extrusion 3D printers, however we have aimed to cover the most frequently u…


OctoPrint Installation and Setup

Posted on 14/11/2020

OctoPrint is an open source web interface for your 3D printer that allows you to control and monitor all aspects of your printer and print jobs, right from your browser.

OctoPrint can run on a number of different systems a…


Connecting your printer to Mattacloud

Posted on 03/11/2020

In this tutorial we will walk you through the simple process of hooking your 3D printer up to the Mattacloud so that you can benefit from all of the features Mattacloud provides.

At present Mattacloud requires you to be using OctoPrint with your 3D…